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DD Book Club: Daredevil Yellow
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Dimetre
Parts of a Hole


Joined: 16 Feb 2006
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 17, 2015 10:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mike Murdock wrote:
Part two. It's essentially part two of the very first issue. I'm curious if the fights at all line up with the ones drawn by, uh, Wally Wood? (*Looks it up and see it's Bill Everett* Daredevil really didn't have an iconic artist to start).

Actually that reminds me of a panel Everett drew that I always loved -- the Fixer tells one of his henchmen to call the cops. Daredevil throws the billy club behind him without even looking, knocking the receiver out of the guy's hand. I always thought that was cool. I wish Loeb and Sale had incorporated that.
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The Overlord
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 19, 2015 9:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mike Murdock wrote:
The due date is always the week after it's posted. I suppose I meant 8/22, though. Honestly, due dates are kinda optional. The idea was to encourage people to post early, but at least by that date.


Sorry, my mistake.

Anyway, again this issue covers a lot of stuff from previous DD origin stories, but I think it does it well. I like the testify scene. I would agree this retelling is somewhat darker then the orginal Silver Age issues, but not as dark as some of the Miller stuff.

The bit that wasn't covered in any of the Miller stories (and was glossed over in the original story) was the introduction of Karen Page, after a bunch of disastrous interviews.

I think the relationship between DD and Karen Page is what makes this different from Man Without Fear, where the love interest was Elektra. There would more romantic stuff between Matt and Karen, while Elektra and Matt are more raw animal magnetism.

Since this issue does cover things that have already been covered and since more of the more important character stuff is covered later on, I will give this issue 3 and half stars.
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james castle
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2015 10:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What happened? Not much. As others have pointed out this is a slightly longer telling of the original story from #1. But Loeb did add a couple new things:

1. Fixer pissed himself before he died. Oh good. It’s amazing they didn’t save that amazing revelation for Original Sin. Aside from just being ridiculous it’s also weird in terms of tone. Here’s a sort of romanticized retelling of the origin story. Now with more urine.

2. Matt really wanted to at least punch Fixer before he had a chance to die. Boo. I always considered Fixer’s death to be one of those unintentional coincidences. Like, Matt was just trying to catch him and he, through no fault of Matt’s, died. Matt knowing that Fixer was about to die and really, really wanting to punch him during his final moments is a bit blood thirsty.

Other than that the dialogue continues to be terrible. You know how comic writers have to constantly sneak in exposition, like people’s names and thing for readers? There’s a right way and a wrong way to do that. Here’s the wrong way:

Quote:
Fixer: Who’s this bum, Slade?
Slade: Dunno. Looks like some kinda wrestler in that get-up, Fixer.


I wonder what their names are!?!!!

Also, I thought the whole “measure of a man isn’t how he gets knocked down (obviously)” thing was dumb but the inspirational message this issue topped it. Here’s Matt thinking about why his Pa liked boxing:

Quote:
It was all about knowing that on any given night, no matter how unevenly matched, two men go in. Only one comes out a winner.


Wait. What? What on earth does that mean? First off “Two men go in. Only one comes out a winner” describes literally everything from checkers to ping pong. Second “no matter how unevenly matched” doesn’t add anything and, in fact, makes boxing sound worse. And “any given night”? Surely only the ones with boxing matches scheduled. Anyway, it’s another example of something that sounds deep but is actually just nonsense.

0/10
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LightningandIce
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 21, 2015 1:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great issue. Most of it is one big fight scene, but it's tense and well done. I love when Matt has the gun to Slade's head, and when he's slowly going after Fixer on the subway. There is an intensity to it. You can feel Matt's emotion, a cross between vengeance and justice. The angles are perfect and the dialogue excellent. Karen's introduction was a really nice touch, too. The montage of Foggy's bad interviews was good, then we get the repeated shot while he slowly looks up at Karen. So there wasn't a whole lot of content, but what we got was spot on.

Mike Murdock wrote:
I'm curious if the fights at all line up with the ones drawn by, uh, Wally Wood? (*Looks it up and see it's Bill Everett* Daredevil really didn't have an iconic artist to start).


This got me thinking, so I decided to break out my reprint of #1 and compare. I hadn't read it in forever and was kind of surprised at a few of the things I noticed. For good measure, I also broke out my Miller/McKenzie trade to compare #164. I also looked at MWOF, but that was radically different from the others and isn't meant to be canon anyway, so I didn't really analyze it that much.

What I found was pretty interesting. #1 and #164 have a lot more differences in them than I would expect. I think that stems from them having different goals and frame stories: #1 is trying to cram in as many establishing details about DD as it can, while #164 is a more personal flashback from Matt's own perspective. There is a lot more going on in #1, and as a result, many of the scenes (even important ones like Matt mourning his father's death) are surprisingly short. #164, on the other hand, expands some of the scenes and gives them more emotional punch.

As far as how they relate to Yellow, Loeb/Sale draw from both, but whenever there is a contradiction, they stick closer to McKenzie/Miller than Lee/Everett.

Since Yellow starts right before Jack's big fight, I'll skip right to there. #1 actually begins with the big showdown with the thugs, then flashes back, but I'll get to that later. The first thing that really surprised me was the name "Kid." Last week we had a discussion about Loeb renamed Jack to "Kid," but it turns out that was Lee/Everett's doing. They don't draw attention to it, but there is a panel that clearly shows a newspaper calling Jack "Kid." It's even more out of place there, so if anything, I would say Loeb was probably trying to make sense out of that little oddity. Though I don't know why he wouldn't just leave it out completely.

Next we have the name of Jack's opponent. #1 calls him Dynamite Davis, and we never see his face but he's blond and has a full head of hair. #164 changes that to Rocky Davis and he looks identical to how he looks here. Yellow obviously calls him Creel, and apparently he is the Absorbing Man. I don't know much about Absorbing Man or how his official story fits, or doesn't fit, or was retconed, or whatever else with Daredevil. All I can say is that Jack's opponent in #1 is clearly not the same guy that we get in this modern incarnation.

On a side note, that panel from Yellow where an angry Jack is resolving himself in the ring is very similar to one of Miller's panels. It's a great shot in both of them.

Anyway, both of them kind of gloss over the actual murder. #164 goes right from the murder to the fight, while #1 hits the same beats as Yellow, with Matt and Foggy graduating and starting their own business. Which is immediately followed by big surprise number two: Karen shows up pretty much as soon as they open. Instead of the meet-cute that get at the end of Yellow #2, #1 actually shows her getting the job before Matt even tries to go after Fixer.

So then we get to the big showdown. The actual fight sticks FAR closer to McKenzie/Miller. In #1, the whole thing takes place in broad daylight. He just walks into their poker game (in costume) and starts bantering. They fight until the minor thugs give up and tell DD if he just waits, Fixer will show up soon. Then we get the flashback that tells the meat of the story. When we get back to fight, Fixer and Slade are just showing up. They talk again, then fight again. The minor thugs pull a couple cheap tricks (including pushing Matt out a window, though he quickly flips back in) while Fixer and Slade escape to the subway. There is no showdown in the gym.

After Matt defeats the thugs, he slips out of his costume to go to the subway undetected. Again, this is taking place in broad daylight. Meanwhile, there is a parallel scene where Foggy and Karen are wondering what the heck is taking Matt so long to get to work. When Matt catches up to Slade and Fixer, he changes back, takes out Slade by throwing his billy club, and catches up to Fixer by (I kid you not) riding on top of a rolling trash can. Then Fixer dies in one panel.

The whole thing is very Silver Age-y. The only specific action beat that Yellow borrows from #1 is Matt swinging the big guy around by his ankles. It does, however, lift the character designs of Slade, Fixer, and the big guy. Not that they are particularly memorable compared to other generic mafia guys, but #164 shows them as being just about as bland as they could possibly get.

Yellow clearly takes its inspiration for the fight from #164. Again, the only specific action beat is DD kicking them down the stairs, but the actual progression is the same. It takes place at night, for one thing. DD bursts in and immediately starts kicking ass. He spins the big guy (from #1), flies down the stairs (from #164) and fights Slade in the gym. This part of the fight is a lot different as well. In #164, a light pops on to show DD standing in the ring with boxing gloves. He taunts them until Slade gets in the ring to fight, at which point DD beats the piss out of him in a straight-up fistfight. It has some similarities with MWOF. I think I like the way it plays out in Yellow better, though there's not denying that the shot of DD standing in the ring beneath the spotlight is pure badass.

Fixer's death is shorter in #164 than here, but it's just as potent, if not more so. (It's still a lot longer than #1, though, in which the entire heart attack takes like one panel.) It's actually very well illustrated, with a series of panels showing Fixer running toward the reader while DD slowly gets closer. There is a heart-monitor thing underneath of them, and which flatlines as soon as DD catches up and grabs him. It gives a completely different feel to the scene than the others. In #1, Fixer clearly died because he was fat and couldn't take the running. Miller's work shows Fixer being terrified, yelling about the devil, his heartbeat getting worse as the scene goes on. The implication is that Matt literally scared him to death. It's actually kind of chilling. Yellow here has the same sort of the thing going on, but #164 is far more potent, perhaps because of its brevity.

That's not to say that I don't like how it's done here. Ultimately, I think this was another really good issue to go with the rest. I'm still enjoying it so far just as much as I did last time. I also had a lot of fun with the side-by-side comparisons.
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Mike Murdock
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 23, 2015 3:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for doing the homework there. That's very interesting. It seems #164 may be the more influential one rather than #1, overall.

Next up:

Daredevil Yellow #3 - Stepping into the Ring



Due 8/29
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The Overlord
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 25, 2015 11:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So this issue covers some new materials and I think gets to the real point of the series. Showing the beginnings of Karen's and Matt's relationship and having them interact in social settings for the first time. Matt beating some bullies was also fun.

Now the scene where the FF goes to Matt's office to hire him as their lawyer is a bit silly, but if Matt is practicing law in the over the top Marvel Universe, I suppose getting bizarre clients is inevitable.

The scene between Slade and Matt was kinda interesting, but it introduced a plot thread that will never be resolved in this series, Matt trying to find out who the Fixer was working for and Slade being unwilling to tell him. We never get a good answer to that question (was it Owl, Kingpin, Bont or someone else?) That's kinda of annoying. Also its really weird that Slade will get the death penalty for killing one guy and Bullseye will kill hundreds of people and the DA never seems to try to have Bullseye put to death.

The ending is a bit interesting, setting up the Owl (who will appear over the next couple of issues).

I going to give this issue 3 stars, I don't like hanging plot threads, so that weighs this issue down a bit.
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Mike Murdock
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2015 7:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

And on to issue two of the original run. Have to say, the Fantastic Four having blind Matt Murdock inspect the Baxter Building was a dumb idea back then that wasn't acknowledged. What he's precisely doing here (more claim of title type stuff) is infinitely more plausible. It's still pretty jarring to see the Thing burst in through a window Kool Aid man style considering the story's been pretty grounded so far.

The first half of the issue is a new scene - Matt hustling people in pool. While it should be seen as risky (why Foggy never thought it suspicious is odd), the point of the scene is still cool. This is Matt - cocky, swave modern Matt - standing up for himself in the face of discrimination. He's showboating to impress Karen, but it works. So, while it's stupid that he would do this, I'll forgive it for the story. The next scene is new too, with Matt trying to find out who the Fixer works for. I assume the implication is it's the Kingpin, but it's a bit odd to have foreshadowing in an essentially stand-alone mini-series about events that have technically already happened.

The last part is issue three, I believe, or maybe issue four. But it's handled in a very different way. In the original story, the Owl was being investigated for financial crimes and came seeking legal counsel (before promptly and oddly saying screw it and going full supervillain). This time, there's a woman who comes in for a noir cry for help and the Owl pops up soon after. Also, instead of Matt sensing his "bird-like aura," he apparently smells more like a bird.

This story is pretty much a new story. The old elements exist only for set-up. There's no Electro, so it isn't issue two and the Owl's story has barely started, so it isn't three. On the other hand, the plot could basically be described as "Matt Murdock plays pool." The Matt/Karen story continues a bit - with the first exploration of their relationship and hints of the love triangle with Foggy. But it's basically barely hinted at in the actual events (as opposed to the monologue). Three and a Half Stars.
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LightningandIce
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 27, 2015 1:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like this issue. It's not as compelling as the last two but it's a welcome addition. Sometimes you need the chance to rest, and I like that we get to see how what the characters acting natural. The Fantastic Four thing was a little out of place and most other modern adaptations would probably leave it out, but I think it works well for what it is. I also like the Slade scene, even if it is cryptic and doesn't go anywhere.

The main draw here is the pool scene. I like seeing Matt on a date. It's a nice touch for a romance plot. I echoed (heh) the same thoughts back when we did Parts of a Hole. Anybody can have characters be passionate in the midst of drama. A good, three dimensional relationship story let's us see them in a realistic setting just like anybody else would be. Well, I mean, a blind man hustling some guys at pool isn't realistic, but you get the point.

On that topic, I have to snicker at the pool thing. It's not just well done in itself, it's a nice shout out to part of Matt's history that we don't see in Yellow. Why is Matt so awesome at pool? Because Stick taught him. How does Stick spend his free time? Hustling people at pool. I can just imagine a cranky old Stick with Matt in the basement of some pool hall going through the "bow and arrow" spiel with a cue. Matt gets it right and Stick uses it to con some poor guy out of his cash. That absolutely seems like something he would do. I'm not sure if Loeb intended it that way, but I like to think it was intentional.

Not as much to say this time around. Decent issue.
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Dimetre
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 28, 2015 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Fantastic Four scene is basically a rewrite of the beginning of issue #2 from 1964. The panel where Karen says, "Please don't make fun of Mister Murdock..." is obviously Sale copying an old photo of Grace Kelly. It's gorgeous, but Grace Kelly was gorgeous.

I don't think Matt was hustling those guys in the pool hall to impress Karen. Obviously this is something he has done many times before Karen even knew about the place. Foggy makes that perfectly clear. Being blind, Matt is obviously a victim of other people's prejudice and ignorance, so this is an outlet for his anger and resentment. Is it wise? Probably not. You'd think Foggy would have more questions about his partner's abilities, other than settling for, "He just can...." Not sure I buy that.

I enjoyed the scene in the alleyway, that followed the whole pool thing. But Matt says, "I don't like Helen Keller jokes. Or the people who tell them." But Loeb told us four of them. I'm not sure what he's trying to say by doing that. I'm just as guilty as anyone else out there for finding some Helen Keller jokes funny. It doesn't mean I don't admire Keller herself, or have disrespect for disabled people. I'll admit that they're insensitive jokes, and part of their appeal is how naughty they are. But by having Matt lecture about how he doesn't like the jokes, while publishing four of the jokes, is Loeb making a point about insensitivity towards the disabled? It's certainly a mixed message.

There was a nice femme fatale moment with Grace, which is obviously leading into the next issue. Indeed, issue #3 of Volume 1 was the Owl's first appearance.

This issue is the least beholden to a 1964 issue of Daredevil so far. I find it kind of strange that Stan Lee took his time building Matt's attraction to Karen in comparison to Loeb, who has Matt fall immediately in love with her. (To be fair, Lee had Karen musing about how she would "marry him in a minute, even though he's blind... if only he'd ask me!" in issue #2. So her intense passion for Matt was immediate.) However, this issue seems to only contribute atmosphere to the overall series. It seems to be more a collection of scenes than a story. The Slade scene, I suspect, is leading us nowhere. I'm sure we'll never see the guys from the pool hall, or the pool hall itself, again. This issue is really about Matt getting to know Karen better.

I guess that's another problem I have with this entire series -- I don't place Karen Page on a pedestal among all of Matt's past loves. To me, the most interesting of his romances was the one he had with Elektra. The silver age romance with Karen was annoying in my opinion, only made mildly entertaining by Foggy's shared interest in her. And she seemed very flaky, with some cringe-worthy lines to her credit. (Especially "I guess I'm just a silly female!" from #4.) I think it took Miller to drag her to rock bottom in "Born Again" to get her to a place where Ann Nocenti could inject some strength into the character. I don't think any writer did a better job with Karen than Nocenti.

But I don't find Karen that interesting, nor the relationship. And this series is a monument to it. Sale is doing stellar work, but Loeb is just treading water. We're about halfway through, and I'm not that invested. 2.5/5
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Francesco
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 29, 2015 2:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

it's not a mixed message, Matt simply is shown as cheating and bullying people weaker than him.
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Mike Murdock
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 30, 2015 8:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Eh, those people were A-Holes. He cheated them to teach them a lesson, he beat them up because they wanted to fight him. The point of telling the jokes while beating them up was to highlight the contrast - emphasizing that it was a "disabled" person who was beating them. Rather than confront them directly, he would pretend to play along and then win. At least, imo.

Anyway, next up:

Daredevil Yellow #4 - Never Lead with Your Left



9/6
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Dimetre
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 31, 2015 11:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think #4 is the strongest issue in the series so far.

It opens with the Electro fight from Volume 1 #2, but Loeb manages to ask an interesting question. In the middle of the fight Daredevil muses, "I had put on the costume to find justice for my Dad's murder. What did this have to do with that?" A valid question, and one that I think this issue addresses.

I have already mentioned my lack of reverence for Matt's relationship with Karen, but even I had a warm, fuzzy feeling when Karen helped Matt with the bowling ball, and her celebration when he knocked down a single pin.

However, I think this issue's crowning moment is the execution of Slade. It is an absolutely gorgeous marriage of text and imagery. The headgear reflected in Matt's shades is going to be hard to forget. It's probably my favourite panel in the series so far. Both Loeb and Sale are stellar in this scene. I'm amazed I had no memory of this scene from my initial reading when this series was first released.

But this leads to a curious choice on Loeb's part: Foggy's decision to propose to Karen. Stan Lee never had this happen in the six issues in which Matt wore yellow. Why is Loeb going here? It makes Foggy look like an idiot. She is still calling him Mr. Nelson, and he only just found out that she wasn't seeing anybody. Why doesn't he ask her out on a date, instead of proposing marriage? I find this stupid, and a weak way to end an otherwise strong issue.

If it wasn't for the final two pages, I would score it higher, but I'm still giving it a 3.5 out of 5.
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The Overlord
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 31, 2015 10:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dimetre wrote:
I think #4 is the strongest issue in the series so far.

It opens with the Electro fight from Volume 1 #2, but Loeb manages to ask an interesting question. In the middle of the fight Daredevil muses, "I had put on the costume to find justice for my Dad's murder. What did this have to do with that?" A valid question, and one that I think this issue addresses.

I have already mentioned my lack of reverence for Matt's relationship with Karen, but even I had a warm, fuzzy feeling when Karen helped Matt with the bowling ball, and her celebration when he knocked down a single pin.

However, I think this issue's crowning moment is the execution of Slade. It is an absolutely gorgeous marriage of text and imagery. The headgear reflected in Matt's shades is going to be hard to forget. It's probably my favourite panel in the series so far. Both Loeb and Sale are stellar in this scene. I'm amazed I had no memory of this scene from my initial reading when this series was first released.

But this leads to a curious choice on Loeb's part: Foggy's decision to propose to Karen. Stan Lee never had this happen in the six issues in which Matt wore yellow. Why is Loeb going here? It makes Foggy look like an idiot. She is still calling him Mr. Nelson, and he only just found out that she wasn't seeing anybody. Why doesn't he ask her out on a date, instead of proposing marriage? I find this stupid, and a weak way to end an otherwise strong issue.

If it wasn't for the final two pages, I would score it higher, but I'm still giving it a 3.5 out of 5.


You know what, I am going to agree with everything you just said.

The Electro fight was fun, bringing up Matt's motivation for fighting crime after his father is avenged is interesting, the scene with Slade getting executed is very good, but the ending with Foggy wanting to propose to Karen is too dopey. I know Foggy is the comic relief and often seems a little pathetic, but this is a little too much, he wants to marry her and they have not gone out on date. Foggy should not be that pathetic.

A couple of new things to add though:

When Matt is fighting Electro, he mentions that super villains didn't really kill anyone back then, which was often true, due to censorship rules. I think the big difference between this series and Man Without Fear is MWOF suggested the darkness was there from the beginning, while Yellow suggests that Matt's world became darker over time. There is kinda of reason Bullseye was introduced in the Bronze Age, rather then the Silver Age. Over time many Silver Age Daredevil villains became more murderous over time (Owl, Purple Man Mr. Fear), while the really silly Silver Age villains, like Matador, Leap-Frog and Stilt-Man were essentially phased out over time.

Now Electro himself was never a really vile villain (sure like many villain, he has the occasional evil deed to his name, but he has gained some sympathetic traits in the pages of Spider-Man, like when he tried to kill himself in a Spider-Man story, you can actually feel a little sorry for him.) Really Electro is likely powerful enough to defeat both DD and Spidey, but he is undone by his own incompetence and low self esteem most of the time.

Another big difference between this series and MWOF, is the different romantic tone it sets. In MWOF, Matt and Elektra's relationship seems more raw and based on animal magnetism, while here, Karen and Matt have a more cute and romantic relationship. The two different romantic relationships are different like night and day.

Anyway I will give this issue 3 and a half stars.
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LightningandIce
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 01, 2015 12:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another good issue. We get some actual superhero-ing here, the first time Matt has tangled with a powered villain. And it's a nice fight as well. I have to wonder why they decided to leave out the part where Matt has the land the rocket though. (sarcasm)

The bowling date was sweet. I think that these scenes are important to romantic stories, and a lot of fiction - especially action fiction - overlook it. I like seeing a realistic depiction of romance. The execution scene was also well done. Realistic, as well, in how it depicts death as so grim. How often do we see violent media and imagine ourselves as stoic in the face of darkness, only to be hit hard when presented for real? Matt learns a lesson here. It's well done.

And like others have said, the marriage proposal is silly and tacked on. There is a decent scene to come out of this sub-plot later on, but overall, it's kind of unnecessary. This could have been left out of story.

I think Yellow has done a great job of reconciling the Silver tone with the darkness that would come post-Miller. I pondered that a lot recently when reading through Bendis. How can this be the same character in the same universe as the guy who crashed a rocket into Central Park? Yellow has bridged these two tones very adequately, and I think this issue has been the best so far.

So yeah, another good one. By the way, if anyone cares, I'm going out of town for about two weeks and will be without internet for most of that, so I'm not sure if I'll be able to get the next issue on time. Hopefully I will, but if not, I'll catch up on the next one.
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Mike Murdock
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2015 7:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

^ Foggy's plan to propose to Karen happened pretty early in the comics too. I agree it wasn't this early, but it felt just as fast to me there (and Foggy felt nearly as dopey for doing so). Then again, every relationship in Daredevil early on seemed to jump straight from meeting to talks of marriage. I wonder if that was a CCA thing or if that's what people did back then. Someone with a better memory might be able to place when it was. If I had to guess, I'd say sometime around the Organizer plot?

This issue starts with a bit of silver age sentimentality. Daredevil is battling Electro and the comment is that villains used to not leave women in a pool of blood. The fact that it's Electro (one the cheesiest villains around from a Daredevil perspective) helps emphasize the silver age aspect of this, but the real point is something quite different since he's talking specifically about Karen's death. While it's always weird to see Electro, I'm glad he provided this opportunity. Plus, it's a good opportunity to help explain why he's doing this (something that felt weird even in the original story). I don't think he ever successfully answered why he's doing it, but at least he's not piloting a rocket ship here (although they did have the rockettes).

As before, this one intersperses classic material with original material. This was Karen helping Matt date. I'm torn. On the one hand, seeing some development of their relationship is a good thing. The original went from (I bet the other one doesn't like me) to it more or less being open. On the other hand, it almost seems like he's hustling Foggy like he did those people in the bar. He doesn't need Karen's help to bowl. But having her help him is bringing her closer to him (and it's not enough that he's saying no, he agreed to go bowling, which made it pretty obvious something like this would happen). The other original scene is Matt attending the execution of Slade. The contrast between Electro and the electric chair is a pretty powerful one. He gets no solace from the death of the person who killed his father. I suppose, instead, the argument is he gets solace from being Daredevil.

I just wanted to comment briefly on the art. Overall, I like it, particularly the colors. The whole thing has a deliberately cartoonish look, which can be hit and miss. I don't really like their Matt Murdock. Foggy is fine (he looks like the Foggy of this era). I really like Karen (this might be my second favorite portrayal of Karen, right after Gene Colan).

I think this story is fairly strong. I liked all the moments. The classic material with Electro was handled well (certainly no worse than original), although it clearly takes up far fewer panels. I think the standout was the choice to include the execution. I think that scene says a lot about Matt's character. I'll go Four Stars.
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