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DD Book Club - A Hanging for a Hero

 
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Mike Murdock
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2020 1:05 pm    Post subject: DD Book Club - A Hanging for a Hero Reply with quote

I'm changing gears and going back to Marv Wolfman this time. I've actually wanted to do this one since the last Presidential election where the Jester's antics seemed very much on point to modern politics. But first, a truly bizarre story with Uri Geller.

Daredevil Vol. 1 #133 - Mind Wave and His Fearsome Think Tank

Quote:
The Jester nearly bungles Foggy Nelson’s chances at becoming District Attorney!


Due 10/10
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Dimetre
Parts of a Hole


Joined: 16 Feb 2006
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2020 4:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This issue is a relic of pop-culture ephemera from May 1976. Back then, Marvel Comics was doing cross-promotion with whoever they could. They did a comic with the original Saturday Night Live cast. Dazzler's origin can be traced back to a deal with Casablanca Records, the label that signed Donna Summer and Kiss, which leads us to the Kiss comic Marvel published.

I honestly don't know how much money Marvel expected to bring in through this deal with Uri Geller, who is the "guest star" of this Daredevil issue. Writer Marv Wolfman clearly didn't invest to much of his creative muscle into the Geller plot, although, I hate to admit, I think there was potential in the villain Mind-Wave and his fearsome Think Tank. When Daredevil gets into hand-to-hand combat with the villain, who can read every thought of everyone around him, I enjoyed Daredevil's observation.
Quote:
Blast me! He knows my every thought as soon as I do! Got to stop thinking... let my instincts take over! No good! He's still able to move out of the way in time! My fight patterns are too ingrained in me -- my subconscious must be reeking with my every move.

For that reason, I think someone like Mind-Wave was a good match for Daredevil, forcing our hero to innovate and try new things. In order to defeat such a villain, Daredevil would have to shut off his brain and force himself to operate in a way that is completely foreign to him. The problem is that by forcing the inclusion of Geller, that potential wasn't realized. The villain is designed for Geller to defeat. I can see a more modern writer like Mark Waid or Chip Zdarsky writing a more fulfilling battle for such a villain.

So much attention is paid to Geller in this issue that Wolfman seems to forget about Daredevil's billy club. He has Geller snap off a steel bar from a window and float it over to Daredevil to smash some glass.

I also didn't like the layout of the numerous dialogue balloons on page three. The page consists of four horizontal panels. Daredevil's dialogue run vertically down the left side of the page, and the news report dialogue runs vertically down the right side of the page. This causes are eye to follow Daredevil's dialogue down the left side and leave the panels before we can even begin to read the news report. It's an awkward layout that shows little understanding of the conventions of comic page layout.

Geller's powers are so ramped up in this issue, he may as well be an X-Man. He seems able to manipulate any metal. He's dismantling guns and bending bars that are metres away from him. This can be seen as elevating someone many accused of fraud, which is discomforting, but Wolfman claims that he merely fit Geller into a universe loaded with other costumed super-powered adventurers. I care so little about Geller that it doesn't bother me. His presence makes this comic way more disposable and cheesy than it needed to be.

For what it is, it isn't awful. I realize that isn't a ringing endorsement. I give this issue a three out of five.
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Mike Murdock
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 06, 2020 7:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This issue features Uri Geller as someone with legitimate supernatural powers. I don't have access to my comics collection at the moment, but I wish I did because I happen to own one of the issues in this story arc and got to read the letters page. To say this issue was controversial is an understatement. The majority of letter writers thought Geller was a straight-up con artist and were not pleased to see this issue. Marvel (presumably Marv Wolfman) sheepishly defended the choice while welcoming opinions, but seemed caught very flat-footed.

I picked this issue honestly because of its take on misrepresentations in the media and "fake news." This has been going on for some time, but it reveals here that the Jester is to blame (Honestly, if I remembered what issue this started in, I'd probably have started the story there, unless we already covered it). Right after that reveal, there's a page where Daredevil appears where the dialogue is organized in a way to be practically illegible because it flows from panel to panel top to bottom while also expecting you to read the panels left to right. It's also a wall of text that's quite daunting.

The issue feels very much like a Saturday morning cartoon with a very silly villain. You could even picture the ending having everyone laughing followed by a freeze frame. The whole thing generally has the vibe of a throw-away story. I think what stands out most is how much the story is emphasizing how real Uri Geller is. Now it's in the context of the Marvel universe, where the Fantastic Four exist, but it's oddly and specifically earnest about this one thing.

Overall, a forgettable waste of a story aside from its historical context. Two and a Half Stars.
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Mike Murdock
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 11, 2020 8:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This title is a mouthful

Daredevil Vol. 1 #134 - There's Trouble In New York City...That's Trouble With a Capital 'T' Which Rhymes With 'D' That Stands For Daredevil!

Quote:
Daredevil and Torpedo give chase to the face-changing Chameleon!


Due 10/17
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I'd give the Devil benefit of law, for my own safety's sake!
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Dimetre
Parts of a Hole


Joined: 16 Feb 2006
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 11, 2020 1:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm reading from Daredevil: Marvel Masterworks Volume 13, so the colours and lines are beautifully restored, even if the comics themselves are sub-par. This issue carries forth the sub-plot where the Jester is feeding fraudulent media to the masses to mess with an election. The main plot of this issue sees Daredevil teaming up with the Torpedo to stop a robbery committed by the Chameleon.

Writer Marv Wolfman pushed as hard as he could to promote the Torpedo, this being the character's second appearance, but he just couldn't make him popular. There's not much to him. He's a formal football star who finds no fulfillment in his current career, and he's managed to get his hands on an aerodynamic jet suit which enhances his punches. He doesn't really do anything Iron Man can't do, and the bored professional athlete persona isn't the most relatable or sympathetic. Plus, the costume is goofy.

The main problem I had with this issue is that the Chameleon is absolutely no match for Daredevil. He can't hide from Matt by changing his outer appearance, which is his entire modus operandi. That gets established early on in this issue, so we just have to wait for Torpedo to once again get into trouble with the Chameleon so Daredevil can step in and once again stop him. Daredevil stops the Chameleon a total of five times this issue. It's as though Wolfman and artists Bob Brown and Jim Mooney had to keep adding in more Chameleon failures until the comic was long enough.

The issue's saving grace is the all the grief the Jester's machinations are causing Matt. Even though no cop has been murdered, the police and public are all convinced that Daredevil is a criminal. It's a neat complication, even though J. Jonah Jameson had been causing similar grief for Spider-Man for over a decade by this point. No matter, it successfully raised the stakes in an issue which would have been a total waste without it. The Jester's plan also led to a nice quick scene with Foggy and Maxwell Glenn's bodyguard. I'm looking forward to an issue where the Jester is centre-stage.

There are inexplicable colour changes, and I can't tell if that is a problem from the original comic, or if it's due to Tom Mullin who's in charge of Masterworks Colour and Art Reconstruction. The first guy whose identity the Chameleon steals has a jacket that changes from blue to green in the space of a panel, and the Chameleon's jacket has the same colour-changing feature.

Until that happens, Daredevil has been forced to share his book with the likes of Uri Geller and the Torpedo. At least Mind-Wave was a threatening enough villain for Matt. As large a figure as the Chameleon is in the Marvel Universe, he just is no match for Daredevil, which makes this issue feel like a waste of time. I give this issue a 2.5 out of 5.
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Mike Murdock
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2020 9:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The issue starts surprisingly slow for a story from this era, focusing on Matt's romance. The big concept is that Matt is very stiff and holding himself back. This has been a theme before when it comes to Matt vs. Daredevil (and Mike Murdock fits in as well). The nice thing about Heather is she can bring him out of his shell just a bit, which I think improves the character. That being said, the way Matt just causes her to lose consciousness is shocking in how brazen it was done. I don't think anyone would think it's acceptable or that feeling minorly guilty is an adequate consequence.

The villain is the Chameleon. I get the impression he's not the normal Chameleon. He's not the most interesting villain for Daredevil. Likewise, Daredevil has help with the Torpedo (the successor to the original, he isn't a criminal but he's mistaken for one).

I think the thing that makes this interesting (and the reason I picked this story arc), is the Jester's fake news causing the police to believe he's a villain. It isn't something that the cops are guaranteed to believe universally, but the point is that some might believe it. The Chameleon would normally be a bad villain for Daredevil since a visual-based villain doesn't fool him. But I like that it tied into the idea of him attacking police. Still, this has a fun silly note to it because of how helpless Chameleon is against Daredevil.

Three and a Half Stars.
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I'd give the Devil benefit of law, for my own safety's sake!
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Mike Murdock
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 18, 2020 10:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Daredevil Vol. 1 # 135 - What is Happening

Quote:
Daredevil plays the upper hand against the Jester…who has falsely accused Ol’ Hornhead of murder!


Due 10/24
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I'd give the Devil benefit of law, for my own safety's sake!
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Dimetre
Parts of a Hole


Joined: 16 Feb 2006
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 18, 2020 4:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This comic ends with a caption reading, "Confused, pilgrim? You ought to be!" I can assure the folks at Marvel that this issue achieved the effect they intended, but I'm not sure if it's for the reasons they wanted, because I found this issue to be a very sloppy mess.

I enjoyed the opening three pages, which just show images and articles from the April 11, 1976 edition of The Daily Bugle. I liked that the Bugle, except for Jameson's editorial, was printing the truth, as the Jester was only able to manipulate the broadcast airwaves. Today we live in an age where the veracity of all news media is being called into question, and this serves as a reminder to be judicious when we choose our sources of news.

The following pages serve as mostly recap for what has come before in previous issues, and there is so much of it that it gets annoying. There had to be a more concise way to do it so we could dedicate more of this issue to advancing the narrative.

The eighth page of this issue shows Foggy and Heather talking about the investigation against her father, for which we don't need a full page. The last panel on that page shows the Jester on a television set vowing revenge on Daredevil for framing him and sending him to jail. We turn the page and a Cronkite-ish anchorman is talking about President Ford vetoing a bill, as Daredevil watches from above. I felt like my Masterworks volume skipped a page, because not only did the Jester's words have nothing to do with Cronkite's, but there was no mention of Matt even intending to visit the newsroom at CBS.

Then he tries to trace an out-of-synch broadcast signal to the Jester's hideout, but it cuts out for a bit, leaving him with nothing to follow. Some drunk roughnecks attack him thinking they can get a reward for doing so, leading Daredevil to say, "All right friends. I hate to say it, but you asked for this--!" We turn the page, and the next panel bears a caption reading "One minute later..." and showing Daredevil swinging away. They didn't even bother showing us the battle, which makes me question the point of even having it happen at all. The next panel shows the signal returning and him following it to the place Jester wants him to go. What was the point of having it cut out so he can have a fight off panel?

A lot of this issue is about misdirection. For a while it seems like Daredevil is playing into the Jester's trap, but then we find out that Daredevil has cooked up a ruse with DA Blake Tower with the intention of snagging the Jester. While I love stories where both the protagonist and antagonist operate from the peak of their intelligence, I don't think writer Marv Wolfman and artist Bob Brown allocated enough space for this issue's plot. Too many pages were dedicated to recap and exposition, and an entire page was inexplicably dedicated to the Jester crowing about how he's the best and how this is "the most sensational drama the world has ever seen."

The issue ends with a very confusing three pages showing Daredevil getting sprung from jail by a helicopter pilot who turns out to be the Jester, which means that somehow our villain was in on Tower's scheme. Jester cuts the line Daredevil was climbing to get up to the aircraft, and our hero falls, ending up standing on the bank of a river. Magically, Jester is down there with him, directing the police to arrest him. It happens so quickly, I had to look it over to make sure what I thought happened actually did.

And that's the main problem with this issue -- passages that need more space don't get it, and passages that need to be more concise aren't. It's a real shame, because this issue actually deals with the story Wolfman had been setting up for a while, and it had been delayed for adventures with Uri Geller and the Torpedo. Now that we were here, you'd think they could have executed it more effectively, since these people know how to put together a comic book. It's probably not a good idea to have the same person as writer and editor. I think someone could have told Wolfman to go back and give this script another draft. They can do better than this, and that's why I'm giving this issue a two out of five.
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Mike Murdock
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 20, 2020 6:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This issue starts very abruptly with Daredevil already realizing the Jester is the mastermind of the behind the scene actions the past few weeks. I feel like he looked at the cover of this issue and went "of course!" (I mean, not literally, he would have to feel it with his hands). I do like that the Jester does have a method to his madness. By discrediting Daredevil, he can redeem himself, which is a key part to his whole plan.

This issue has an interesting use of powers with Daredevil sensing "rogue" radiowaves that must be the Jester's transmission. I know he's got radar senses, but this doesn't come off as particularly plausible and, since very little effort is put into explaining it, I'm not sure Marv Wolfman had a better sense of it. It's not the silliest thing he's done, it just doesn't make any intuitive sense to me either.

Everything sort of happens abruptly, which I think is part of the reason for the senses thing. The Jester had to lead Daredevil to the scene of the crime so he could be framed for his murder. Daredevil is shockingly captured by the police! But it turns out it's all part of an elaborate plan of his. That plan leads to a prison break where Daredevil encounters the Jester and, despite not being alive, the police are still mad at DD for some reason.

This is definitely a convoluted mess of a story. There's too much that doesn't make any sense. The rest is pretty poorly paced. I think that has a lot to do with it being only 18 pages, but the story doesn't spend time on the things that need time. Two and a Half Stars.
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I'd give the Devil benefit of law, for my own safety's sake!
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Mike Murdock
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 25, 2020 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Daredevil Vol. 1 #136 - A Hanging for a Hero

Quote:
The maniacal Jester seizes the public’s attention with a fake telecast starring the ‘President of the United States’. Now all costumed heroes are in trouble!


Due 10/31
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I'd give the Devil benefit of law, for my own safety's sake!
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Dimetre
Parts of a Hole


Joined: 16 Feb 2006
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 25, 2020 8:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gerald Ford was only president for two and a half years, and not only did he have to endure Chevy Chase's bumbling portrayal of him on Saturday Night Live, he had his image manipulated by the Jester in this issue. (And the current White House resident thinks the media's treated him unfairly....)

Another thing I found amusing about this issue was Daredevil's reference to "secret wars" in Saudi Arabia and Chile. This reference pre-dates the massive 80s crossover series of the same name by eight years. I'm sure there is no link between this issue and that series, but it made me smile.

I think this issue is quite a bit better than the previous issue, avoiding much of that one's pacing problems. John Buscema, one of the top artists in Marvel history, steps in to relieve Bob Brown on pencils, and does a great job. I thought the Jester's ten-storey murder maze was a lot of fun, and I liked how Daredevil swung in to stop the bank robbery even though it turned him into a target.

On the other hand, this issue's beginning was very confusing. Even though the previous issue showed Daredevil escaping prison, it turns out that was just an imposter Daredevil working for the Jester. The real Daredevil didn't break out at all, proving to DA Tower and the Mayor that he's a good guy. Also, a coroner was unable to tell the difference between the Jester's supposed dead body and a machine. That strains credulity, as does Daredevil's ability to regain consciousness while standing with his neck in a noose.

Still, the depiction of society going nuts while the Jester manipulates the media works in a surprisingly topical way, as I'm constantly confronted with people grasping on to misinformation if it allows them to not take the COVID-19 pandemic as seriously as they should. Marv Wolfman made me feel the mob's descent, and he deserves credit for that. I think Daredevil is a skilled enough fighter that he shouldn't have been overwhelmed by the crowd in the bank, no matter how many of them there were, let alone rendered unconscious, but I can see how others could accept that. It made for a harrowing enough cliffhanger.

This was a big improvement from the last few issues. I give this one w 3.5 out of 5.
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fubarthepanda
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 27, 2020 9:31 am    Post subject: DD #133 & #134 Reply with quote

Wow, fell behind here! Just have to do a couple two-in-one's...

DD #133

Ah, yes, the infamous Uri Geller issue... Wolfman (as EIC) falls on the sword and assigns himself the ignominious task of working in this real-world guest appearance, which ends up feeling more like a fill-in issue despite being created by DD's regular creative team. A little bit more effort is put into the antagonist Mind-Wave, but he ends up being a one-note wonder best known for being one of the villians killed by Scourge in the infamous Captain America "Overkill" issue years later...

At this point, I believe we're about half-way through Wolfman's run, which earlier saw DD break-up with the Black Widow while introducing Copperhead, the Torpedo and -- most importantly -- Bullseye. Wolfman also provided DD a new supporting cast in the form of girlfriend Heather Glenn, unlikely ally DA Blake Tower, and skeptical Detective Bert Rose. Not the biggest Bob Brown fan, who had been drawing the book for a couple of years by this point, but Jim Mooney gives the art a nice polish.

But perhaps the most amusing thing about this issue is that it opens with the ongoing Jester sub-plot -- basically Wolfman putting his best foot forward with a teaser for a future (better!) issue. "Stick in there, faithful DD readers!"

DD #134

In general, I'm a huge a Wolfman fan (Tomb of Dracula and New Teen Titans are perhaps two of my all-time favorites). But the Torpedo was a major misfire and we have to suffer through another guest appearance here as he teams up with DD to take down the Chameleon. Of course, Wolfman also gave us Bullseye, so all is forgiven on that front, but this particular issue feels like another fill-in (complete with another teaser for the subsequent Jester story).

But just as last issue was infamous for Uri Geller, this one is equally notorious for DD giving a Vulcan nerve pinch to Heather Glenn in order to protect his secret identity, which, even by 1970's standards, was a bit of a stretch. (Of course, Wolfman was also EIC and the book's editor at the time, so I imagine there weren't too many checks-and-balances. Cue the "chubby" Foggy Nelson caption later in the issue as well.)

But, yeah, these two issues are probably the nadir of Wolfman's run, although I do appreciate the "fake news" sub-plot and it's relevancy to media (both social and otherwise) today.
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Mike Murdock
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 28, 2020 7:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This issue feels like it could be a satire of modern politics despite being set during the Gerald Ford Presidency. The idea of fake news and not knowing what to believe (even when the stories are impossibly contradictory) feels nothing new these days. I also like that the fake news machine was invented to have dead movie stars in productions (which is very much a debate these days for franchises when a key role passes away). That being said, it's a very talky first two-thirds of this book, which makes things pretty slow.

Things pick up a little bit when the Jester has everyone decide to kill the police (once again, not out of place in a modern satire, but the politics seem a bit mixed up). That being said, it's still fairly dull.

I wish I liked this story more. But it's just not particularly interesting in its execution. Three and a Half Stars.
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I'd give the Devil benefit of law, for my own safety's sake!
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fubarthepanda
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 28, 2020 10:36 am    Post subject: DD #135 & #136 Reply with quote

I think this catches me up...

DD #135

After six months of teasers, the main event is finally here as DD puzzles out that the Jester is behind the onslaught of "fake news" that torpedo'd Foggy Nelson's re-election campaign, framed him for murder, and has the city on edge. And to summarize these events, we get not one, but three (!) pages of news re-caps, as well as two more pages of flashbacks recapping their original encounter towards the end of the Stan Lee run (whew!).

This sets up a clever and convoluted game of cat-and-mouse with the Jester initially unaware that DD is on to him, with DD also not aware of the extent of the Jester's surveilance operation. So, DD seemingly takes the fall for "murder" and surrenders to the authorities, while secretly colluding with DA Blake Tower; and the Jester counters with another frame job.

The ending here is intentionally confusing with DD acting out-of-character as the Jester turns the tables on him by casting him (again) as the villain to the eyes of the world... "say it isn't so, DD!"

Yes, it's kooky and crazy and requires some suspension of disbelief, but it's different then your typical fisticuffs and the broader issue of media manipulation is just as relevant today (if not more) then it was almost fifty years ago.

My only real gripe with this issue that DD once again abuses Heather Glenn, this time smacking a newspaper out of her hands in anger. Not a good look, Marv!

DD #136

The Jester's end game is finally revealed as he uses a deep fake (just how prescient was Marv Wolfman here?!) of President Gerald Ford to turn the people of NYC against the police and its superheroes, in order to create a smokescreen for a series of mass robberies (ho hum).

Unfortunately, despite being one step ahead of the Jester last issue, DD falls behind as he's unable to counter the angry mob that has been ginned up over the fake news and finds himself on the wrong end of the Jester's noose...

One thing I did like here is Wolfman's tease of the Jester's "Murder-Maze". This was a couple of years before Claremont would come up with Arcade and "Murderworld", and was no doubt inspired by the various death traps that were popular in the martial arts films of the early seventies.

But the real win here was the debut of Big John Buscema as interior artist, even if it's only for a couple of issues (he did some earlier covers). You can almost feel the Jester's cackle in his hands and having one of Marvel's all-time greats grace these pages is a real treat!

I dunno, after Uri Geller and the Torpedo, I'm enjoying these issues much more then the rest of you guys!
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